Competitors from 18 nations will compete in ten different adaptive sports with events being held across Greater Sydney, including Sydney Olympic Park and on and around the iconic Sydney Harbour.

These adaptive sports closely resemble the standard sports but with some modifications to the rules and equipment to better meet the needs of the competitors.

For more information on each of these sports and how to get involved, visit our Adaptive Sports page.

Archery

Archery

Archery involves using a bow to propel arrows at a target from a set distance. The objective is to hit the centre of the target, making archery a test of accuracy, concentration and strength. At the Games, competitors will be permitted to shoot from a sitting or standing position depending on their ability.

Athletics

Athletics

Athletics consists of running, jumping and throwing events. Competitors of all abilities may participate, including those competing in wheelchairs, with prostheses, or under the guidance of a sighted person known as a guide.

Indoor rowing

Indoor rowing

Indoor rowing is a sport of endurance, power and speed whereby a rowing machine is used to simulate the action of traditional watercraft rowing. The rowing machine can be modified to enable all competitors to participate.

Powerlifting

Powerlifting

Powerlifting is a strength competition. Classed according to weight group, competitors have three attempts to bench press the bar. The competitor to successfully lift the heaviest weight wins.

Road Cycling

Road Cycling

At the Games, competitors will compete in two cycling events; the time trial and the criterium. In the time trial, competitors race individually and the fastest time over a set distance wins. In the criterium, competitors start together and the first across the finish line wins. Bicycles, tricycles, tandems, recumbents and handcycles can be used in these events to ensure maximum participation.

Sailing

Sailing

A brand new addition to the Invictus Games, the objective of sailing is to complete a set course in the fastest time.

Sitting volleyball

Sitting volleyball

Sitting volleyball is a team sport whereby, like traditional volleyball, competitors hit the ball over the net with the objective of landing it in the opposing team’s half of the court. Points are awarded to the team that wins the rally. Players must have at least one buttock in contact with the floor whenever they make contact with the ball.

Swimming

Swimming

Both an individual and team sport, competitors will compete in freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly events. The first competitor or team in relay style to touch the timing pad at the end of the last lap wins. Competitors of varying physical abilities may participate in this sport. In fact, swimming is one of the longest-standing sports for competitors with disabilities.

Wheelchair basketball

Wheelchair basketball

Wheelchair basketball is a team sport played by competitors in wheelchairs. The objective is to throw the ball into the opponent’s hoop. The team with the most points by the end of the game wins. This sport is quite similar to the stand-up version. The size of the court and the height of the net is the same as in able-bodied basketball. A key difference is that competitors must throw or bounce the ball after every two pushes of the wheels on the chair, otherwise they will be penalised for travelling.

Wheelchair rugby

Wheelchair rugby

Wheelchair rugby is a team sport played by competitors in wheelchairs. The objective is to score the most goals by carrying, dribbling or passing the ball toward the opponent’s end. Contact between wheelchairs is allowed and happens often as players attempt to stop their opponents and take control of the ball. Players gain points by touching the goal line with two wheels while in possession of the ball.